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do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
of the most powerful voices of criticism of president obama when it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into the party. >> he can become a cable tv host. one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today, he's gone, over, history. it sounded like a valedictory. he was sort of going to recede, did it twice. tried, lost and there were a lot of people who recorded him as a transitional figure even when he was nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bayne capital, who knows? i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him broaden out? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a house member to get and that is nationwide recognition. he is also a bonafide brainiac with budget things. you may not agree with what he likes to do with the budget, but he understand. so there is still a place for him there. he
it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into this party at this point. >> he can become a cable tv host. >> who knows. >> with one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today -- >> he's gone, he's over, history. it w it sounded like a valedictory. he didn't talk about our cause will live, we're going to continue to fight in the future. it was sort of like he was going to recede, he had done it twice, he lost. there are a lot of people who regarded him as the transitional figurine when he was the nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bain capital, who knows. i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? he's long been considered one of the rising stars of the republican congress. will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him try to broaden out, claim the mantle of the party standard bearer? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a hou
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
party would be fiscally conservative on foreign policy and military policy. and on social issues, we would be libertarian, we're going to say, we're going to stay out of your pocketbook and bedroom. and that party could be a majority party. >> people said -- >> sorry. go ahead. >> i think if we were running that way this time, we win by 4% or 5%. >> what about the tea party? there are people who say the tea party wanted pure candidates, i put that in quotes. your party lost some unlosable races, they may have cost republicans control of the senate. a lot of republicans have trouble bringing this issue up. >> i think what we really should try to do with the tea party, get them to figure out what are your priority issues? the whole reason they got established, was big government, heavy taxes, obama care, government trying to direct your life and allow a certain amount of flexibility on social issues. conservatism on foreign policy and allow people to disagree with each other, sort of in the ronald reagan mold, if you agree with me on eight out of ten issues you are my friend. somehow w
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
of foreign policy. a runaway train. most of the assistance programs need to have much more scrutiny overseen by the state department's broader foreign policy. >> i think we have had the discussion of why a military sequester might be well command for good reasons and i want to thank the audience for paying close attention and panelists for their presentations. >> more now from a new america foundation forum on the so-called fiscal cliff. over the next hour and 10 minutes a discussion about automatic budget cuts benefiting social programs. >> i am vice president of the economic policy center for american progress and i will be moderating this panel. i caught a bit of the last panel and we will be moving from guns to butter i guess or something. as we talk about how we are going to deal with the fiscal cliff, whether or it will be a grand bargain or models through or whatever happens, there are a number of programs that are undoubtedly going to get particular attention, really hot potatoes. they are programs that are very much the public is very aware of and things very much in the political d
is also continuously focused on his foreign policy and national security agenda. he has great confidence in the acting cia director. he has confidence in his military and the secretary of defense and defense department to carry out the mission has easy signed to them. but he's got obviously a lot that he wants to get to work on, and he's doing that this week. >> how does this affect, though, his need to revamp the national security team. >> again, i think these are specific questions about specific individuals and posts. i can say now, even though you haven't asked, that i have no announcements to make with regards to personnel and no speculation to engage in. i can tell you that the president has not made a decisions on personnel matters and you will not hear me discuss them until the president has made those decisions and has announced them. >> jay, you're saying regarding two specific people you can't extrapolate. these are two military brass involved in extramarital affair or what might be called inappropriate behavior. is the president at all worried about an inappropriate culture i
, president obama, when it came to foreign policy decisions, surpassed mitt romney in who you trust to handle a crisis. lou: we're out of time here, but i just have to say, i don't recall a number that has surprised me more in exit polling than the fact that 51 percent of the people surveyed said that they blamed obama more than they did -- i mean, president bush more than president obama when it comes to the economy. >> and that is a huge deal. the fact that president bush is still getting blamed for the economy is something that clearly is showing up in those poll numbers. lou: we appreciate it. thank you. great work last night. president obama winning a second term as his party added to its majority in the senate, counting independent democrats could have a caucus of 55 members up from 53. among the most closely watched races, a democrat elizabeth warren beating republican incumbent senator scott brown. and in indiana, the democratic congressman, jim donnelly, defeating richard. in missouri democratic incumbent successfully fought off a challenge by congressman taught a kid who was not abl
presidents moving to foreign policy over the last two years. so what can he get accomplished in 16 months. it's the confidence. it's like getting the game-winning shot. then you can come back. i think there will be a certain amount of confidence that he's going it have. i think you saw that on tuesday night. tuesday night you saw the president obama that we saw in 2008. which we hadn't seen up until that moment. >> and he spoke about citizenship. that was refreshing, what are our responsibilities. it's not just a sound byte of ask not, as important as that was,. >> yes forward backward frame, that was fine. but that's your point is it's sort of a cotton candy. there's ultimately not a lot there. the citizen concept is loaded with a lot of important ideas that go to the heart of what we are as americans what it means our constitution. >> gavin: for the millennials which you speak of, which are naturally wired, literally and figuratively in that empathetic role. >> this is something that you spent a lot of time on. you've looked at this issue. you've done this. it will be interesting to see the
up to the very different foreign policy challenges and returning veterans challenges that we have today. >> ari, i'm going to pull a pivot. i don't want to talk about that. i want to talk about something else, which ties in both the petraeus story and veterans. >> well, we have a rule that if you want a pulitzer, you can completely ignore the host's questions. so you're fine today. >> fair enough. i forge on. the thing that struck me about the petraeus story is the damage that this puts on the troops and veterans. because, look, the military, for the last 10 or 15 years, has emphasized that it's a values-based organization, and the primary value that i hear talked about all the time, particularly in combat among what i call the working class of the military, the sergeants is and the lieutenants who do most of the heavy lifting in combat, the key value is doing the right thing when no one's looking. and there was nobody in the military, i think, who exemplified that more than david petraeus. he talked about it all the time. now to find out that he was not only not doing the right t
congress on foreign policy. megyn: i do want to say this, simon, is -- so he has this liberal think tank called nxn, and at ndn.org if you go to simon rosenberg blogs, you will see simon's full defense of susan rice, and it is an interesting read, and it espouses your position well, because i missouri you've taken a lot of incoming -- [laughter] >> particularly here, megyn. megyn: i recommend people check it out and make up your own minds. >> thanks, megyn. >> thank you. megyn: well, we saw one more dramatic moment on libya yesterday when our own ed henry asked the president what he would say to the families who lost loved ones in this benghazi that day about the lack of answers? here's the president's answer, in part. >> i'll address the families not through the press, i'll address the families directly, as i already have. megyn: next hour, we will speak to one family member directly when the father of one of the navy seals who was killed in benghazi joins us live. >>> and the dow jones average is down about 25 points today, but down more than a thousand points over the last few weeks.
partisan than i thought it would be including matters on foreign policy. it felt it first on the debate of the resolution to authorize president bush to go into kuwait to get hussein out. along the way, there have been many great moments of bipartisan achievement, and, in fact, i would say that of all of things i'm feeling good about that i've been a part of in the 24 years i've been in the senate, not a one of them have been partisan. .. >> be effective that is that you get 0%. >> senator kyl what happened? why this happened? >> forgive me for doing this, but think you doing this and thank you to "the wall street journal" for making this possible. mr. murdoch, it's great have a chance to visit with you. mr. prime minister, i haven't had a chance to visit with him as of yet. he is very good at this. i'm thinking about running for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young fresh
important foreign policy has become to them and particularly their strong support for the state of israel. i wouldn't say every mailing we send, just about every mailing we sent out mentioned either obama removing jerusalem from the capital of israel and reinserted it or mentioned his call for israel to return to 67 border or mentioned the fact that his administration had slow walked sanctions against iran. those issues have real resonance among them. >> jonathan is one of washington's most thoughtful journalists. he's been covering this steek or it for a long time, and thank you, ralph, for your excellents. he's the money and politics report enand the past president of the national prez club. what did you see yesterday what does it mean for the country and. >> well, in 2010, we saw the secret money in the races took control of the senate and house. and all service said, it's going to be a foreshadow in the 2012. it wasn't. obama was able to raise as much money with romney. romney had help with the super political action committees and outside groups. the money was even. obama wasn't swamped
on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine. the g
with mitt romney, governor romney for not mentioning it. and the third debate on foreign policy, he didn't mention veterans one time and in his 45-minute acceptance speech. but what's important is now that that election is over, craig, we need to come together as americans, democrats and republicans. to do all we can to help these public/private partnerships to be there for these heroes. craig, as you know, it's less than 1% of americans have served in iraq or afghanistan. and over, almost 500,000 of them, suffer from post traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. that's the signature wound of these wars. we need to learn the lessons from world war ii, from korea, from vietnam. from desert storm that we're going to do all we can as a nation to take care of these heroes when they come home. >> congressman, i want to go inside the campaign for a few moments here before i let you go. there's the, there's a report today in "the wall street journal" i want to throw up a full screen here, it describes the negative attacks that the obama campaign ran early on. it describes them as pa
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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